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Things no body about Fighting for cancer

Over the weekend, I read an interview by Jeremy Bowen ( BBC reporter and correspondent) talking about his diagnosis of Bowel cancer. This got me thinking of absent friends, Joe, Jimmy, Hump, Mick and my great mentor Derick.
I also got to think about my friends Paul, Glen, Claire and others who have written about their recovery from the big C.
Although great friends I never really got to see what went on behind the scenes with them.
Then Last July my world was turned upside down and my life got kicked into the long grass. I got THE phonecall from someone very close to tell me that they had just been diagnosed with Cancer. How was this at all possible, he is a strong, solid guy?? But then you realise that Cancer has no prejudices. Everyone and anyone is in the firing line.
I got to see and be behind the curtains with others who have been diagnosed with cancer. What a world that is! Visits to haematology clinics, oncology specialists, blood tests, scans and lots more. A different world of unknowns,
Then came the Chemotherapy cycles, 2 days of Chemo and 1 day of antibodies. Followed by 3 to 7 days of absolute tiredness. Treatment was twice a month for 9 months ! 3 days before Chemo, blood tests to make sure that the blood platelet count was high enough to make sure he could go into hospital to have the Chemo. If not, wait another week. 12-15 tablets a day. Constant poisoning the body to deal with the Cancer. The acceptable tolerance level after chemo is to be believed. Nose bleeds are ok unless there is more than half a glass full, ulcers and lots more to go into detail about. Things that the general public would rush to the doctors or A&E if they had the symptoms are accepted as part of the treatment.
Then, watch a person age by the minute. Its scary.
The Chemo cycle finished a couple of weeks ago. Then yesterday, off to Hospital for a PET scan to see if he had gone into remission. Expectations were high. Only to be told that the scan could not be carried out as the blood test showed that the sugar level was too high .Massive disappointment. Going back on the 23rd. Lets see what happens.
We think we have control of our lives, but believe me that once something takes over our inside , we have no control. I sat there and watched how the doctors and nurses worked unflinchingly. They are amazing. As I write this, I’ve just had a message from a friend whose father has just passed from Cancer. Its horrible.
I haven’t written this for any sympathy but just to say that if you hear of someone who has been struck down by Cancer or any other debilitating condition, stop for a minute and genuinely wish them well and pray for them. Also, think about the people around them who sadly get to witness what goes on behind the scenes.
Stay well and stay blessed56

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