+255 716 958 597 sales@kilimanjarobrothers.com

Login

Sign Up

After creating an account, you'll be able to track your payment status, track the confirmation and you can also rate the tour after you finished the tour.
Username*
Password*
Confirm Password*
First Name*
Last Name*
Email*
Phone*
Country*
* Creating an account means you're okay with our Terms of Service and Privacy Statement.

Already a member?

Login
0
Items : 0
Subtotal : $0.00
View CartCheck Out
+255 716 958 597 sales@kilimanjarobrothers.com

Login

Sign Up

After creating an account, you'll be able to track your payment status, track the confirmation and you can also rate the tour after you finished the tour.
Username*
Password*
Confirm Password*
First Name*
Last Name*
Email*
Phone*
Country*
* Creating an account means you're okay with our Terms of Service and Privacy Statement.

Already a member?

Login
0
Items : 0
Subtotal : $0.00
View CartCheck Out

Kilimanjaro Tipping Guidelines

Understanding this dilemma requires seeing the overall cost of the hike as including the tips.

Kilimanjaro Tipping Guidelines

Tanzania’s custom of tipping differs from other countries. Unfortunately, this custom can become contentious if it is not explained. Tanzania is not a wealthy country, and Westerners might see the local customary wages as unjust. Companies outside the Kilimanjaro Tour Operators Association (KIATO) can avoid this requirement, but Kilimanjaro Brothers is a member, and thus pays its porters the customary amount.

Misunderstandings might arise at the end of the climb when guests are asked to tip the workers certain amounts. Understanding this dilemma requires seeing the overall cost of the hike as including the tips. Every porter (or guide, cook, waiter etc) gets the equivalent of his daily wage as a tip at the end of the hike, as opposed to merely doubling the wage. In effect, this means that the daily wage (for example) if a porter is required to be paid US $10/day, PLUS the tip of US $10/day from the group.

Why not just pay the porter US$20/day? The answer is chiefly cultural. In Tanzania, it is seen as honorable and more personal for hikers to go through the ceremony of giving this offering directly to the people who have made this experience possible.

As in any business, there is a defined hierarchy among the workers. In Africa, this hierarchy is important and deserves respect. The workers spend many hard years making their way up the order and have earned the respect that comes with their position. Accordingly, a sliding order governs the tipping amounts, from the porters at the lower end up to the head guide at the top. Going up the scale, the amounts are at the discretion of the hikers, with the understanding that the scale begins with the tip to a minimum of US$10/day for porters, as of 2017.

0

Your Cart