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Female Packing List for Trekking Mount Kilimanjaro

Kilimanjaro Lemosho Route

Preparing for the trek to the African continent’s highest point is a long process. Once you’ve selected a trekking company, paid the deposits, booked your flights, received all your vaccinations and trained up well enough, packing hardly seems like a big task. While your trekking company will send you an extensive list of what to bring, but it doesn’t include those items plus things that a lady wish had been in her bag. While the list is long, always keep in mind that lighter is better, for your sake and that of your porters. No one wants to be the jerk with the super heavy pack!

Regardless of the climbing route that you choose and amount of days that you spend on the mountain, making your way to the Uhuru Peak at the top of Mount Kilimanjaro will be one of the most challenging, and ultimately rewarding experiences of your life.

You Recommend What? Four Random Things to Bring With You

Dark Fingernail Polish – Some of you may read this and think that we care too much, but I promise that this is a sentiment echoed by many women on the mountain. Despite your best efforts, it is impossible to keep the dirt from under your nails. The solution to keep from being completely grossed out: a few coats of dark fingernail polish. You can leave the bottle at the hotel with the rest of your belongings, but you’ll be glad that your hands don’t look like those of a mechanic by day three.

Panty Liners – We should all strive to leave a small “footprint” on the mountain and not contribute to the existing trash problem. Toilet paper is the eyesore of the trek, as hikers seem to use it with abandon and then… abandon it; sometimes even on the actual trail. While there are times that you absolutely must use (and leave) toilet paper, panty liners can help to minimize the need for toilet paper in most scenarios. You will be peeing a lot, due to your water intake and Diamox use, and instead of using (and leaving) TP, drip-dry as best you can and then a panty liner will help with the rest. You can replace the liner once you’re done hiking for the day, and you will dispose of one liner in the shared chemical toilet versus 5+ little piles of TP along the trail.

Something Sentimental – By the time you make it to Uhuru Peak you will be physically exhausted and possibly delirious. It’s an emotional experience and I recommend bringing something sentimental to take a photo of (or share a personal moment with) at the top.

Gifts For Your Porters – You will get to know (and love) the group of 20-25 men who help you to get to the top. They carry your bags, filter your water, set up your tents, clap and sing for you upon return to camp each day — they’re amazing! A gift of any size will help to say “THANK YOU.”

Remaining Packing List

General rule: No cotton on the mountain. Go for wicking fabrics for all clothing and undergarments.

Clothing
4 pairs of underwear(depending on the days you spend on the mountain)
1 snow jacket with hood*
2 pairs of pants (at least one pair that zips off to shorts)
1 long sleeve shirt
1 light weight jacket (fleece pullover or similar)
1 waterproof jacket (shell)
4 pairs of wool socks
1 Buff
1 pair of light gloves (use most mornings)
1 pair of serious snow gloves (for summit night)
2 pairs of long underwear bottoms (for sleeping and summit night)
2 sports bras
1 hat with bill or brim
1 seriously warm head beanie
Sunglasses
Waterproof pants* (Used on summit night, for protection against the wind)
Shoes

Slip-on shoes with decent grip (You will be glad you have these for late-night trips to the bathroom)
Hiking boots

Gears
Day pack backpack (Approx. 20L and designed for use with a Camel bak bladder; use it to carry your camera, water, rain gear, sunscreen, snacks, etc.)
40-60L backpack or duffel bag (holds all personal items plus sleeping bag and sleeping mat)
Stuff sacks for clothing (makes packing and unpacking each day much less frustrating)
Water bottle (Nalgene or similar)
Camelbak bladder (at least 3 liters)
Sleeping bag rated to 10 degrees Fahrenheit*
Trekking poles*
Gaiters* (I wish I could wear these every day—so convenient)
Headlamp* (Plus extra batteries)
Large rain poncho (this can cover both you and your daypack in the event of a downpour)

Medicals
Diamox (Prevents altitude sickness)
Cipro and anti-diarrhea (Just in case)
Ibuprofen or Tylenol (Treats mild cases of altitude sickness)
Birth control and/or tampons (If traveling long-term; removes the need to carry tampons or pills)

Toiletries
Roll of toilet paper
Face tissues
Unscented, biodegradable wet wipes
Anti-bacterial hand sanitizer
Solid deodorant
Sunscreen
Lip balm (w/ SPF)
Face wash bar
Face lotion
Hair brush
Extra hair ties
Hand/feet/body warmers
Large and small bandages and moleskin (For blisters, cuts, scrapes)
Antibiotic ointment

Technology
Camera + extra battery
iPod for summit night
Kindle or book – Quite a bit of down time
Optional – Solar-powered device charger

Miscellaneous
Small, quick-drying hand towel (for washing your face)
Snacks (Almond butter packets, candy, etc.)
Ziplock bags for trash and dirty laundry
Journal
Small detergent packets for washing underwear and socks
Clothes pins for hanging up wet laundry
$250-$300 in USD for tipping guides, chefs, and porters at the end of the trek

 

* Item can be rented. However, We would recommend that you bring your own jacket and sleeping bag as the ones  rented are quite often used and may have some minor unnoticed faults.

What You Don’t Need
Shampoo + Conditioner – You won’t use it

Random Tips
If you get cold at night (which you will), use your heavy jacket as an extra blanket on top of your sleeping bag instead of wearing it. Trust, it will make a big difference.

Practice replacing your headlamp batteries before summit night, as you don’t want to get caught in the dark, fumbling around with tiny screws.

Create a “Summit Night” iPod playlist ahead of time, making sure that it’s at least 8-hours long and will get you to the top! Keep your iPod deep in a breast pocket so it doesn’t freeze.

Try to time your trek so that you summit on or near a full moon. The amount of light makes a huge difference, and you may not even need a headlamp. Some companies charge more for the luxury. Kilimanjaro Brothers does not.

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